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U THANT ELECTED UN SECRETARY-GENERAL

November 30, 1962


U THANT ELECTED UN SECRETARY-GENERAL


New York City (JFK+50) U Thant of Burma was elected today as the third Secretary-General of the United Nations.


He replaces the late Dag Hammarskjold who was killed in an airplane crash last month.


U Thant’s term will extend through November 3, 1966.


U Thant was born on January 22, 1909 in Pantanaw, British Burma.


He became director of broadcasting in 1948.  In 1949, he became secretary to the government of Burma in the Ministry of Information.


From 1951 to 1957, U Thant served as secretary to the Prime Minister of Burma, U Nu.*


*U Thant was UN Secretary-General through 1971.  He died at the age of 65 in 1974.



    UN Secretary-General U Thant
Photo by Yoichi R. Okamoto (1968)
               LBJ Library Photo



November 30, 1950


TRUMAN WILL NOT RULE OUT USE OF ATOMIC WEAPONS IN KOREA


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) President Harry Truman was asked today at his press conference if he is prepared to authorize the use of atomic weapons to achieve peace in Korea.


The President said the United States will take….“whatever steps are necessary to contain communist expansion in Korea….(&) that includes any weapon we have.”


Mr. Truman also blamed the Soviet Union for using Chinese insurgents as part of a plan to spread communism in Asia.



                Atomic Test in Nevada
                    November 1, 1951
                         NARA Photo


November 30, 1864


REBS DEVASTATED AT FRANKLIN, TENNESSEE


Franklin, Tennessee (JFK+50) The Confederate Army of Tennessee under command of Lt. General John Bell Hood suffered a devastating defeat today at the hands of a Union army under Major General John M. Schofield here in Franklin, south of Nashville.


The battle, which began at 4 in the afternoon & concluded at 9 p.m., was fought in an area 2 miles long & 1 & a half miles wide.


The intense fight included hand to hand, bayonet clashes in the yard of the Carter House which General Schofield was using as his headquarters.

           
                       Carter House
              Franklin, Tennessee


Casualties were reported at about 2500 for the U.S. & 7000 for the Confederates.*


*Sam Watkins of the 1st Tennessee Infantry later wrote:


“It was the bloodiest battle of modern times in any war.  It was the finishing stroke to the independence of the Southern Confederacy.  I was there.  I saw it.”



                   Battle of Franklin
          By Kurz & Allison (1891)
        Library of Congress Photo

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