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Archive for the month “November, 2011”

U THANT ELECTED UN SECRETARY-GENERAL

November 30, 1962


U THANT ELECTED UN SECRETARY-GENERAL


New York City (JFK+50) U Thant of Burma was elected today as the third Secretary-General of the United Nations.


He replaces the late Dag Hammarskjold who was killed in an airplane crash last month.


U Thant’s term will extend through November 3, 1966.


U Thant was born on January 22, 1909 in Pantanaw, British Burma.


He became director of broadcasting in 1948.  In 1949, he became secretary to the government of Burma in the Ministry of Information.


From 1951 to 1957, U Thant served as secretary to the Prime Minister of Burma, U Nu.*


*U Thant was UN Secretary-General through 1971.  He died at the age of 65 in 1974.



    UN Secretary-General U Thant
Photo by Yoichi R. Okamoto (1968)
               LBJ Library Photo



November 30, 1950


TRUMAN WILL NOT RULE OUT USE OF ATOMIC WEAPONS IN KOREA


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) President Harry Truman was asked today at his press conference if he is prepared to authorize the use of atomic weapons to achieve peace in Korea.


The President said the United States will take….“whatever steps are necessary to contain communist expansion in Korea….(&) that includes any weapon we have.”


Mr. Truman also blamed the Soviet Union for using Chinese insurgents as part of a plan to spread communism in Asia.



                Atomic Test in Nevada
                    November 1, 1951
                         NARA Photo


November 30, 1864


REBS DEVASTATED AT FRANKLIN, TENNESSEE


Franklin, Tennessee (JFK+50) The Confederate Army of Tennessee under command of Lt. General John Bell Hood suffered a devastating defeat today at the hands of a Union army under Major General John M. Schofield here in Franklin, south of Nashville.


The battle, which began at 4 in the afternoon & concluded at 9 p.m., was fought in an area 2 miles long & 1 & a half miles wide.


The intense fight included hand to hand, bayonet clashes in the yard of the Carter House which General Schofield was using as his headquarters.

           
                       Carter House
              Franklin, Tennessee


Casualties were reported at about 2500 for the U.S. & 7000 for the Confederates.*


*Sam Watkins of the 1st Tennessee Infantry later wrote:


“It was the bloodiest battle of modern times in any war.  It was the finishing stroke to the independence of the Southern Confederacy.  I was there.  I saw it.”



                   Battle of Franklin
          By Kurz & Allison (1891)
        Library of Congress Photo

ROSS DOUTHAT SAYS JFK WAS MEDIOCRE AT BEST

November 29, 2011


ROSS DOUTHAT SAYS JFK WAS MEDIOCRE AT BEST 


New York City (JFK+50) Op-ed columnist for the New York Times, Ross Douthat, wrote in his editorial published on the internet on November 26 & in the New York Times on November 27 that John F. Kennedy was a mediocre president at best & a “near disaster” at worst.


Douthat begins by saying:


“The cult of John F. Kennedy has the resilience of a horror-movie villan.  No matter how many times the myths of Camelot are seemingly interred by history, they always come shambling back to life in another television special, another Vanity Fair cover story, another hardcover hagiography.”


In reference to Stephen King’s latest novel, “11/22/63,” Douthat says that the book’s “narrative power still depends on accepting the false premises of the Kennedy cult–premises that will no doubt endure so long as the 1960s generation does, but still deserves to be challenged at every opportunity.”


This serious op-ed columnist says that the premise (by us 60s generation types) that JFK was a “very good President who might have been great” is shared by “few serious historians.”*


*A poll of 49 historians by the Chicago Tribune in 1982 has JFK ranked 14th while another poll of historians by Arthur Mr. Schlesinger, Jr. in 1996 shows JFK at #12 of 43 men who have served as President of the United States. 


Note: #1-11 could be classified as “Great”, 12-24 as “Very Good”.  


Douthat concludes his, as JFK might have said ‘less than brilliant’ piece with the conclusion that “the JFK cult matters because its myths still shape how we interpret politics today.  We confuse charisma with competence, rhetoric with results, celebrity with genuine achievement.”**


**The full editorial can be read at www.nytimes.com/2011/11/27/opinion/sunday/Douthat-The-Enduring-Cult-of-Kennedy.html


READERS RESPOND TO CRITICISM OF JFK


New York City (JFK+50) The New York Times today published several well-written “Letters to the Editor” in response to Ross Douthat’s op-ed column of Nov. 27th titled “The Enduring Cult of Kennedy.”


The first letter was written by noted Kennedy historian Robert Dallek.


Mr. Dallek, who wrote “An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963,” says that President Kennedy’s legacy deserves “better than Mr. Douthat gives him”.


Dallek correctly reminds us that while JFK’s legislative program did not pass until after his death, he did “put (it) on the table & would have been well positioned to pass (it) after his more than likely re-election in 1964.”


The second letter comes from Ben Miles of Huntington Beach, California.


Mr. Miles writes:


“Seldom does an anniversary of (JFK’s) death pass that I don’t reflect on & find inspiration in the wit & wisdom of his words.”


Barry Pritzer of Greenfield Center, New York, in the 3rd published letter, says that JFK is remembered by the 1960s generation “for the deep level of hope he inspired in people around the world, through his intelligence, his cultural appreciation, his call to service, his youth & his soaring rhetoric for the possibility of a better world.”


In the final published letter, former Time Magazine Washington bureau chief, Stanley Cloud, writes that Douthat’s “obvious aversion to polls showing that JFK rivals Lincoln & Reagan for the mantle of ‘greatest president’ prompts me to observe that the 80s generation has formed a formidable cult of its’ own.”*


*The full text of the letters can be found under “Why JFK’s Legacy Endures”, The New York Times Editorials/Letters, November 29, 2011.


JFK50 RESPONDS TO TIMES OP-ED CRITICISM OF JFK


Knoxville, Tennessee (JFK+50) I sent an email this evening to the New York Times for their op ed columnist, Ross Douthat.


I admitted to Mr. Douthat that I am a “charter member” of the “Kennedy cult” of which he writes & asked him to take a look at JFK+50 to see what kind of influence this “mediocre” President had on me.


In keeping with Mr. Dallek’s letter to the editor today, I affirmed that Douthat’s judgment that JFK was “ineffective in domestic policy” is unfair.


As Mr. Dallek says, JFK put the agenda in play & while it did not pass until after his death, it would have passed had JFK lived & been re-elected to a 2nd term.


JFK was opposed by southern Democrats who opposed change as well as Republicans in the 2 years & 10 months he was in office.  With re-election, he would, & Mr. Dallek agrees, have been in a position to get his legislative program passed.


I concluded my email to Mr. Douthat by saying that “this mediocre president” inspired my generation & people across the globe, as Barry Pritzer suggests, “for the possibility of a better world.”


As President Kennedy said in his Inaugural Address on January 20, 1961:


“I do not believe any of us would exchange places with any other people or any other generation. The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our country & all who serve it, & the glow from that fire can truly light the world.”

LBJ ADVISED TO ESCALATE BOMBING OF NORTH VIETNAM

November 28, 1964


LBJ ADVISED TO ESCALATE BOMBING OF NORTH VIETNAM 


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) President Lyndon B. Johnson was advised today by the National Security Council to escalate the bombing of North Vietnam.


The NSC includes chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Maxwell Taylor, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara & Secretary of State Dean Rusk.


The measure was recommended to the President in order to boost the morale of the South Vietnamese, cut communist infiltration into the south, & force Hanoi to stop its support of insurgency in South Vietnam.


The President’s civilian advisers reportedly want a graduated escalation in the bombing while his military advisers favor a “fast & full” escalation.*


*LBJ ordered “Operation Rolling Thunder” which began in March 1965 & lasted through October 1968.  This bombing operation followed the gradual escalation recommendation.



     US Navy Bombing North Vietnam
                 US Navy Photo (1968)


November 28, 1954


ENRICO FERMI DIES AT 53


Chicago, Illinois (JFK+50) The 1st man to create & control a nuclear chain reaction, physicist Enrico Fermi, died here in Chicago today at the age of 53.


Born in Rome in 1901, he earned his doctorate at the University of Pisa & in 1929 became the youngest man ever elected to the Royal Academy of Italy.


He was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for “identifying of new radioactive elements.*


*Fermi sent a letter to FDR warning of the danger of German development of the atomic bomb.  The letter led to the Manhattan Project.



                       Enrico Fermi
        Los Alamos ID Badge Photo


November 28, 1925


GRAND OLE OPRY IS ON THE AIR IN NASHVILLE*


Nashville, Tennessee (JFK+50) WSM radio began broadcasting a new “barn dance” program today from the National Life & Accident Insurance Company here in Nashville.


The radio program features a 77 year old fiddler named Uncle Jimmy Thompson.


*We have taken liberties with the term “Grand Ole Opry” which was not spoken on air until Dec. 10, 1927.  The program was 1st known as the “Barn Dance” but in introducing Deford Bailey, “the harmonica wizard” in 1927, emcee Walter Damrosch said:


“For the past hour, we have been listening to music from the Grand Opera.  From now on, we will present the “Grand Ole Opry”.**


**The Barn Dance followed NBC Red Network’s Music Appreciation Hour which consisted of classical music.


On June 5, 1943, the Opry moved to the RYMAN AUDITORIUM.  It would be the home of the Opry until 1974 when the move was made to the Grand Ole Opry House at Opryland USA.



               Ryman Auditorium
   Home of the Grand Ole Opry
                      (1943-1974)
          Nashville, Tennessee
  Photo by Ryan Kaldari (2005)



CAROLINE BOUVIER KENNEDY BORN

November 27, 1957


CAROLINE BOUVIER KENNEDY BORN 


New York City (JFK+50) Senator & Mrs. John F. Kennedy were blessed with the birth of a baby girl today, Caroline Bouvier Kennedy.


Caroline was born at the Cornell Medical Center here in New York City.


She was born at 8:15 this morning, local time, & weighed 7 pounds, 2 ounces.


Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy is 27 years old while her husband, the Senator, is 40.*



Caroline & JFK Aboard the Honey Fitz
       Hyannisport, Massachusetts
                    August 25, 1963
          Photo by Cecil Stoughton
                JFK Library Photo


*Caroline was 3 years old when her father was inaugurated President of the United States & was 6 when he died.  She graduated from Radcliffe College & received a J.D. degree from Columbia Law School.


Caroline Kennedy married Edwin Scholossberg on July 19, 1986 but she did not change her name at marriage.  The couple would have 3 children:  Rose, Tatiana & John.



                     Caroline Kennedy
  Photo by Martyna Borkowski (2008)


Happy Birthday Caroline from JFK+50!


November 27, 1962


JFK BEGINS TALKS WITH PM OF SOMALIA


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) President John F. Kennedy opened the 1st day of 2 days of discussions today with the Prime Minister of the Republic of Somalia, Dr. Abdiraschid Ali Schermarche.


The discussions will include international problems as well as the economic development of Somalia.*

      Dr. Abdiraschid Ali Schermarche
Photo presented to JFK with inscription
 “To President Kennedy with cordiality
               & friendship 28/11/62″
                  JFK Library Photo


*Dr. Abdiraschid Ali Schermarche was born in 1919.  He graduated from Sapienza University of Rome with a major in political science in 1958.


He became President of Somalia in 1967 & died on October 15, 1969, shot by one of his own bodyguards.


November 27, 1911


WHITE HOUSE HOUSEKEEPER DISCUSSES PRESIDENT’S EXPANDING WAISTLINE



Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) Elizabeth Jaffray, a housekeeper at the White House, had a conversation today with President William Howard Taft & the 1st Lady, Mrs. Helen Taft.


The subject of the conversation was the President’s ever expanding waistline.


Mrs. Jaffray said that Mr. Taft’s typical breakfast consists of “two oranges, a 12 ounce beefsteak, several pieces of toast & butter, & a vast quantity of coffee with cream & sugar.”*


*William Howard Taft, who was 5’11”, ranged from 270 to 340 pounds.  



                William Howard Taft
      Official White House Portrait
                     By Anders Zorn



NEW YORK TIMES TOM WICKER DIES AT 85

November 26, 2011


NEW YORK TIMES TOM WICKER DIES AT 85


New York City (JFK+50) The NEW YORK TIMES published the news this morning that long-time political reporter & columnist Tom Wicker died yesterday at the age of 85.


Tom Wicker, who was the only Times correspondent covering JFK’s visit to Dallas in November 1963, died of an apparent heart attack at his home near Rochester, Vermont.



                             Tom Wicker


Mr. Wicker was born in Hamlet, North Carolina & was a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Once when asked if he had any heroes in political life, Wicker answered:


“I think the journalist sees the feet of clay & the warts.  I found (politicians) to be truly engaging human beings & admirable people but not really impeccable heroes.  We should try to see people as clearly as we can.  Then, if a hero does come into view, we can give him his due.”


It is clear that Richard Nixon probably wouldn’t qualify as a Wicker hero, even if he had one, because he was on Nixon’s “master list” of political opponents.



                 NY Times Headquarters
               Photo by Haxorjoe (2007)


The NEW YORK TIMES OBITUARY FOR TOM WICKER


“Tom Wicker, one of postwar America’s most distinguished journalists, who wrote 20 books, covered the assassination of President John F. Kennedy & became the paper’s Washington bureau chief & iconoclastic political columnist for 25 years, died on Friday (November 25, 2011) at his home near Rochester, Vermont.  He was 85.*


*Please check today’s JFK ASSASSINATION BLOG for more information on Tom Wicker’s coverage of JFK’s assassination in Dallas on 11-22-63.


November 26, 1926


VINCENT MASSEY BECOMES CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO THE UNITED STATES


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) Charles Vincent Massey assumes his post today as the 1st Canadian ambassador to the United States of America.


In fact, the Honorable Mr. Massey, who was born in Toronto in 1887, becomes the 1st Canadian envoy with full diplomatic credentials to a foreign capital.*


*Vincent Massey became Governor General of Canada in 1952 & served until 1959.  He was invited by President Eisenhower to visit Washington, D.C. & spoke to a joint session of Congress on May 4, 1954.  Mr. Massey died in London in 1967 at the age of 70.



Vincent Massey (R) with Charles Lindbergh (C)
                      & William Philips (L)


November 26, 1917


NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE IS FORMED


Montreal, Quebec (JFK+50) The National Hockey League was formed today.


The teams which are to make up the NHL include the Montreal Wanderers, Ottawa Senators, Quebec Bulldogs & Toronto Arenas.*


*Toronto  won the 1st League Title & the 1918 Stanley Cup.  The Stanley Cup is named after Lord Stanley of Preston, Governor General of Canada appointed in 1888, who became an avid ice hockey enthusiast.



                      1918 Stanley Cup


November 26, 1842


NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY FOUNDED IN SOUTH BEND


South Bend, Indiana (JFK+50) The University of Notre Dame was founded today here in South Bend, Indiana.


Notre Dame, which means “Our Lady” in French (reference to the Blessed Virgin Mary, patron saint of the university), was founded by Father Edward Sorin, CSC, who will also serve as 1st president of ND.*


*Notre Dame today ranks 19th nationally among the most prestigious universities.  ND is also known for its athletic teams which are the “Fighting Irish”.



               Notre Dame University
                South Bend, Indiana
Photo by Tobias & Cornelia Rad (2006)

JFK LAID TO REST IN ARLINGTON

November 25, 1963


JFK LAID TO REST IN ARLINGTON


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) On this national day of mourning, the late President John Fitzgerald Kennedy was laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery.


One of the saddest days in the history of the nation’s capital began just after 10 a.m. when JFK’s casket was removed from the Capitol Rotunda by a military honor guard & placed on a horse drawn caisson.

The caisson was followed by a sailor bearing the flag of the President of the United States & by a riderless horse with boots turned backward in the stirrups.



JFK’s Casket Removed from Capitol
               November 25, 1963
      Photo by David S. Schwartz
               JFK Library Photo


The procession marched slowly to the beat of muffled drums.


From the White House, the procession made its way to nearby Saint Matthew’s Cathedral on Rhode Island Avenue where a Low Mass was conducted by the Archbishop of Boston & close Kennedy family friend, Richard Cardinal Cushing.



           St. Matthew’s Cathedral
     1725 Rhode Island Avenue NW
                 Washington, D.C.
Photo by GreetingsEarthling (2005)


As the President’s flag-draped casket was moved out of the cathedral & placed back on the caisson, John F. Kennedy, Jr., dressed in blue, raised his right hand in a soldier’s salute in honor of his dad.


“John John,” as he is often called, is 3 years old today.


The procession continued past the Lincoln Memorial & across the bridge to Arlington National Cemetery.


There, on the hill just below the Custis-Lee Mansion, the body of the 35th President of the United States reached it’s final resting place.



      Jackie & Bobby At Arlington
                November 25, 1963
             Photo by Abbie Rowe
              US Army, NPS Photo


Mrs. Kennedy, Bob & Ted Kennedy together lit the Eternal Flame which will forever burn at the grave of JFK.



                The Eternal Flame
        John F. Kennedy Gravesite
      Arlington National Cemetery
             Photo by WKnight94


November 25, 1961


PRESIDENT INTERVIEWED BY KHRUSHCHEV’S SON-IN-LAW


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) President John F. Kennedy was interviewed today by Aleksei I. Adzhubei, son-in-law of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev & a journalist for Izvestia.


Mr. Adzhubei asked JFK a variety of questions about subjects such as Soviet-American relations, communism, Berlin, NATO & nuclear testing.


During the interview, Mr. Adzhubei told Mr. Kennedy that his election last year “was met with great hope by public opinion” in Russia.*


*Aleksei I. Adzhubei resigned following the removal of Nikita Khrushchev as Premier in 1964.  He died at the age of 68 in 1993.












HAPPY THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

November 23 & 24, 2011


HAPPY THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY


Knoxville, Tennessee (JFK+50) We would like to wish everyone in the United States & all Americans throughout the world, a very happy Thanksgiving holiday.


While Thanksgiving is celebrated in the U.S. on the 4th Thursday of November, it is celebrated in Canada on the 2nd Monday in October.


The American Thanksgiving holiday is traced back to the 1621 celebration held at Plimoth Plantation.  



         “The First Thanksgiving”
by Jennie A. Brownscombe (1914)


November 23, 1961


SOVIET BORDER GUARDS STOP US TRAIN IN BERLIN


West Berlin, Germany (JFK+50) Last night a train carrying 74 U.S. troops & their families was stopped & detained by Soviet border guards here in Berlin.


The Soviets were not permitted to board the train despite claims that there was an East German “stowaway” on board.


After a brief standoff, an East German citizen was turned over to the Soviets & the train was allowed to pass.*


*JFK was briefed on this development while celebrating the Thanksgiving holiday in Hyannisport.



                   West Berlin
  Truman Library Photo (1952)


November 23, 1963


JFK’S BODY LIES IN STATE AT THE WHITE HOUSE


Washington, D.C.(JFK+50) After undergoing autopsy at the United States Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland, the body of President John F. Kennedy arrived at the White House at 4:30 a.m. Washington time.


A military honor guard removed the flag draped coffin from the Navy ambulance & placed it in the East Room.


Mrs. Kennedy, still wearing the pink suit stained with her husband’s blood, followed the procession.



         JFK’s Casket in the Entrance Hall
                           White House
                       Washington, D.C.
                     November 23, 1963


A private funeral mass is scheduled for 10 a.m. & members of Congress, the Supreme Court & other government officials may pay their respects afterward.


The new President, Lyndon B. Johnson, issued a proclamation making the day of JFK’s funeral, November 25, 1963, a national day of mourning.


In issuing the proclamation, LBJ said:


“I invite the people of the world who share our grief to join us in this day of mourning & rededication.”


November 23, 1963


WORLD MOURNS THE LOSS OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) Millions of people around the world, including Pope Paul VI, are mourning the death of President John F. Kennedy today.



Here in Washington, hundreds of people have gathered outside the gates of the White House.


In Moscow, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev paid a personal visit to honor President Kennedy at the American embassy.


In a telegram to President Johnson, Khrushchev said:


“John F. Kennedy’s death is a serious blow to all people who cherish the cause of peace & Soviet-American cooperation.”


In London, Sir Winston Churchill issued a statement that said JFK’s assassination has “taken from us a great statesman & a wise & valiant man.”


November 24, 1963


OSWALD SHOT BY DALLAS NIGHTCLUB OWNER


Dallas, Texas (JFK+50) The lone suspect in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Lee Harvey Oswald, was shot today by a Dallas nightclub owner as he was being transferred to the Dallas County Jail.



            Lee Harvey Oswald (1959)


The shooting took place this morning as Oswald was being led out into the garage area of the basement of Dallas City Hall & Police Headquarters.


A stocky man in a suit & hat suddenly appeared from a line of reporters & fired a shot into Oswald’s abdomen at close range.


The man who did the shooting, Jack Rubenstein, was immediately disarmed, wrested to the ground & taken into custody.


Oswald was rushed to Parkland Hospital, where President Kennedy died on Friday afternoon, for emergency surgery.


Oswald, who had a massive wound, was pronounced dead at 1:07 p.m. Dallas time.


Rubenstein, who goes by the name of Jack Ruby, owns the Carousel Club here in the city.  Mr. Ruby’s motive is not known.


The shooting was being televised live nationally at the same time President Kennedy’s body was being taken from the White House to the Capitol.










JFK DIED 48 YEARS AGO TODAY

November 22, 2011


JFK DIED 48 YEARS AGO TODAY


Knoxville, Tennessee (JFK+50) 48 years ago today, November 22, 1963, John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas.



I was a 15  year old sophomore at Young High School here in Knoxville.


During my 6th period World Geography class, Mr. John Hicks, our principal, came on the intercom.


While I do not remember his exact words, I know he announced that President Kennedy had been shot.


Mr. Hicks then turned the intercom to radio & we listened to the news reports from Dallas.


My own high school students would later ask me what the reaction of my fellow students was to the news.  


I told them that we were all in a state of shock.  Not one word was spoken.  


There had not been a Presidential assassination since William McKinley in 1901 & the last unsuccessful attempt on President Truman happened when we were 2 years old.


My generation grew up in a state of innocence.  We, as well as many of our parents, could not believe this could happen in our country.


At some point, Mr. Hicks told us that he would leave the radio on & we would stay in our 6th period class until the end of the school day.


When the announcement came over the radio that President Kennedy had died, Mr. Hicks came back on.


Every morning at Young, we all stood to attention as the school bugle corps played “Reveille” as the American flag was raised to full staff.


Now, Mr. Hicks asked his faculty & students to stand at attention as the bugle corps played “Taps” & the flag was lowered to half-staff.


Other than the loss of friends & relatives, this is the saddest moment of my life.


JFK was my hero as he was a hero to many Americans & to many people around the world.


The moment that we learned our hero, who was the youngest elected President of the United States,  was murdered was one that none of us would ever forget.


We all remember to the detail where we were & what we were doing when we heard the news.


JFK inspired me as our President, & he has continued to inspire me 48 years after his death.


A letter to the editor in today’s Knoxville News-Sentinel today expresses so well the impact that JFK had on my generation.


The letter is titled “President Kennedy gave country hope” & is written by Mr. Larry D. Lutze of Powell, Tennessee.


Mr. Lutze asks:


“What did (JFK) possess besides his charm, good looks, youth & wit that caused this feeling to be with us still?”


In answer to his own question, Mr. Lutze answers:


“It seems that this man stimulated a deep & vibrant hope, a dream of what could be, a time in history that has become known as a brief, shining moment.


His greatest contribution was just that, to bring hope, to inspire a sense of confidence in the people themselves, a sense of trust & purpose in the American government.


He was not perfect.  He had his faults, his weaknesses, his misjudgments.  But the American people forgave his shortcomings because he gave us a sense of what human beings, despite their imperfection, can do in a short time on the Earth.”


Thank you, Mr. Lutze, for expressing so well the feelings of so many of us about the man who we honor today on this, the 48th anniversary of his death.*



          White House Historical
               Association Photo


*For more information on November 22, 1963, check out my JFK ASSASSINATION BLOG www.jfk50d.blogspot.com  


I will post accounts from my copy of the Knoxville News-Sentinel Final Edition for Nov 22, 1963. 

KENNEDYS BEGIN WHIRLWIND TEXAS TOUR

November 21, 1963


KENNEDYS BEGIN WHIRLWIND TEXAS TOUR


Houston, Texas (JFK+50) President & Mrs. John F. Kennedy’s whirlwind tour of Texas began this morning as they arrived in San Antonio.



      JFK & Jackie Arrive in Texas
San Antonio International Airport
              November 21, 1963
      Photo by Cecil Stoughton
              JFK Library Photo


JFK has scheduled a 2 day, 5 city tour to attract voters for his 1964 re-election bid & to raise money for the 1964 campaign.


At the Brooks Air Force Base, the President helped dedicate the Aerospace Medical Health Center.


JFK spoke about America’s effort in space:


“A country as rich & powerful as this….should be second to none. This nation has tossed its cap over the wall of space & we have no choice but to follow.”


The President is accompanied by his wife, Jacqueline, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson & his wife Lady Bird.


Other dignitaries traveling across Texas with JFK include Texas Governor John B. Connally & Texas Senator Ralph Yarborough.



               The Connallys & Kennedys
                                Texas Tour
                        November 21, 1963


Continuing to Houston, JFK stopped at the Rice Hotel where he spoke to a meeting of the League of Latin American Citizens.


Mrs. Kennedy also spoke to the group, but in their native Spanish language.


This evening the President will deliver a speech at a dinner honoring Texas Representative Albert Thomas.



                            Rice Hotel
                      Houston, Texas


November 21, 1963


JFK DECLARES WAR ON POVERTY


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) Economic advisers at the White House today were informed that President Kennedy intends to make poverty a top priority of his legislative agenda in 1964.


The administration’s War on Poverty program most likely will be directed through the Department of Health, Education & Welfare.


War on Poverty will include social programs such as medical assistance for senior citizens & improvement in the nation’s educational system.


As JFK said in his inaugural address of January 20, 1961:


 “If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich.”







JFK ANNOUNCES END OF BLOCKADE OF CUBA

November 20, 1962


JFK ANNOUNCES END OF BLOCKADE OF CUBA


Washington, D.C. (JFK+50) President John F. Kennedy announced today the end of the United States naval blockade of the island of Cuba.


The blockade, officially called a quarantine, has been in place since October 24.  


The President’s announcement, which brings an end the Cuban Missile Crisis, comes after Premier Khrushchev’s removal of all Soviet missiles as promised.


JFK said:


“The evidence indicates that all known offensive missile sites in Cuba have been dismantled & their missiles have been loaded on Soviet ships.”



             US Navy Plane Flies Over 
                      Soviet Ship with
             Crated Missiles on Board
                         October 1962


November 20, 1947


PRINCESS ELIZABETH MARRIES PHILIP


London (JFK+50) Princess Elizabeth, heir to the British throne, was married today to Philip Mountbatten, former prince of Greece & Denmark.


The wedding took place at Westminster Abbey where the Archbishop of Canterbury, Geoffrey Fisher, & the Archbishop of York, Cyril Garbett, officiated.


The wedding ceremony was broadcast to 200 million people around the world by the BBC.


Princess Elizabeth is 21 years old while Philip is 26.


Mr. Mountbatten served as a naval officer in World War II.



    Portrait of Queen Elizabeth II
           & the Duke of Edinburgh


November 20, 1945


NUREMBERG TRIALS OPEN TODAY


Nuremberg, Germany (JFK+50) 24 Nazi war criminals were put on trial today here in Nuremberg by the International Military Tribunal for the Prosecution of Major War Criminals.


Among the defendants are Hermann Goering & Rudolf Hess. 


Prosecutor Robert Jackson said in his opening remarks:


“That four great nations, flushed with victory & stung with injury, stay the hand of vengeance & voluntarily submit their captive enemies to the judgment of law is one of the significant tributes that power has ever paid to reason.”*


*19 defendants were convicted, 10 were hanged while Goering committed suicide.



     Nazi War Criminals in the Dock
        Nuremberg, Germany (1945)















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